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English Phrases & Expressions

Daily English Phrases & Expressions

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English Phrases & Expressions

🪩 Play devil\'s advocate\n\n🪄To present the other side or both sides of an argument.\n\nExample:\n I just need you to support me, not to keep trying to play devil\'s advocate.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 To up the ante\n\n🪄A similar idiom to ante up is up the ante, which means “raise the stakes.” When people up the ante, they bet more money than the person before them. This is used similarly in everyday conversation, when someone raises a bet or agrees to do more.\n\nExample:\nI wanted to place a $10 bet on the soccer match, but Daniel upped the ante and raised the bet to $50.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Break even\n\n🪄This is the term you use when you’ve spent a certain amount of money, then earned roughly the same amount to balance it out.\n\nExample:\nThe trip to the beach cost me $100, but I almost broke even after winning $90 in a contest.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Break the bank\n\n🪄This refers to something that is overly expensive—something that requires more money than you have.\n\nExample:\nTaking a week-long vacation would break the bank. There’s no way I could afford to do it.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Shell out money\n\n🪄This means you hand out money to pay for something. It uses “shell” in the sense of shelling peas from a pod.\n\nExample:\nI wish I hadn’t gotten that new car now that I’m shelling out $1,000 a month in payments.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Midas touch\n\n🪄This idiom comes from the story of King Midas, who turned everything he touched into gold. It’s used to say that someone is very successful in their business ventures and has an easy time making money.\n\nExample:\nJane really has the Midas touch. Every business she starts becomes very successful.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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1,481

🪩 Go with the flow\n\n🪄To go with the flow is to allow things to happen and accept them as they are, like a leaf floating along on the surface of a river.\n\nExample:\nJust go with the flow and see what happens!\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Lost at sea\n\n🪄Just as you’d be overwhelmed if you were stranded in the ocean, to be lost at sea is to feel unsure about what to do or that you don’t have any purpose or plan.\n\nExample:\nI feel lost at sea. I just don’t think this is the career path for me.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Receive a kickback\n\n🪄If you receive a kickback, it means you are receiving money illegally, like a bribe.\n\nExample:\nThe police chief was arrested after it was revealed that he was receiving kickbacks to ignore certain crimes.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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📌Follow TOP English Learning Channels in the World!\n\n👇👇👇\n\n✦ English Slang Words \n\n✦ English Stories \n\n✦ English Idioms \n\n✦ English Phrasal Verbs\n\n✦ English Phrases & Expressions\n\n✦ English Collocations\n\n✦ English Podcasts\n\n✦ Daily English Conversations \n\n✦ English Language\n\n✦ Espresso English\n\n✦ English Quizzes\n\n✦ English Proverbs \n\n✦ English Gate Learners\n\n✦ English Songs Lyrics\n\n✦ TOEFL English\n\n✦ English Grammar \n\n✦ English Vocabulary\n\n✦ English Language\n\n✦ IELTS English \n\n👆👆👆\n\n🙌Join them all👏


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🪩 Living hand to mouth\n\n🪄This means you’re barely earning enough to survive: any money that comes into your hand is immediately spent on food to put in your mouth.\n\nExample:\nI don’t make much from my job as a cashier, but I’m able to make ends meet.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 As genuine as a three-dollar bill\n\n🪄This is an American idiom that is used to say something is fake. The U.S. never made three-dollar bills, so there’s no such thing as a genuine three-dollar bill.\n\nExample:\nThose supposed designer bags they sell on the street are as genuine as a three-dollar bill.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 In the red\n\n🪄In a traditional ledger book, debits (losses) are noted in red ink. To be in the red is to lose more money than you make.\n\nExample:\nI’m in the red this month after paying that speeding ticket.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 In the black\n\n🪄The opposite of being in the red is being in the black, which means that you’ve made more money than you spent.\n\nExample:\nAfter working a couple of small jobs over the weekend, I earned an extra $500 and am back in the black.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Eyeball it\n\n🪄Sometimes you don’t need an exact measurement: a rough estimate is good enough. When you estimate an amount of something based on how it looks, you can say you’re eyeballing it.\n\nExample:\nI’ve made this recipe often, so I didn’t bother to measure out a cup of rice; I just eyeballed it.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Rule of thumb\n\n🪄If you hear someone say as a rule of thumb, they mean that it’s a general, unwritten rule learned from experience, as opposed to exact guidelines.\n\nExample:\nAs a rule of thumb, you should always pay for your date’s dinner.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Keep your chin up\n\n🪄If you’re having a hard time, a supportive friend might tell you to keep your chin up. This means they are encouraging you to stay positive and not let difficult circumstances get you down.\n\nExample:\nI know it’s hard having a sick family member, but keep your chin up.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Keep an ear to the ground\n\n🪄To listen for new information.\n\nExample:\nI\'ll keep an ear to the ground for any updates on the project.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Sights set on | Set sights on\n\n🪄To desire something or to make a goal.\n\nExample:\nI have my sights set on going to France next year. | I set my sights on going to France next year.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Add fuel to the fire\n\n🪄To make a situation worse.\n\nExample:\nYou should wait until later to say something. Sometimes arguing just adds fuel to the fire.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Bone to pick\n\n🪄To be angry about something and want to discuss it.\n\nExample:\nYou might not think you did anything wrong but I have a bone to pick with you about that.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Draw the line\n\n🪄To decide on a stopping past which you will not let something continue.\n\nExample:\nI\'m going to have to draw the line here. I can\'t do any more work until you pay your balance.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Fortune favors the bold\n\n🪄Taking a risk can pay off.\n\nExample:\nThere\'s only a 10% chance of success but the payout is 20 times higher if I win. You know what they say, fortune favors the bold.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Cry wolf\n\n🪄To ask for help or attention by lying about a situation.\n\nExample:\nIf you keep crying wolf, nobody is going to help you when you really need it.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 To up the ante\n\n🪄A similar idiom to ante up is up the ante, which means “raise the stakes.” When people up the ante, they bet more money than the person before them. This is used similarly in everyday conversation, when someone raises a bet or agrees to do more.\n\nExample:\nI wanted to place a $10 bet on the soccer match, but Daniel upped the ante and raised the bet to $50.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Break the bank\n\n🪄This refers to something that is overly expensive—something that requires more money than you have.\n\nExample:\nTaking a week-long vacation would break the bank. There’s no way I could afford to do it.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Shell out money\n\n🪄This means you hand out money to pay for something. It uses “shell” in the sense of shelling peas from a pod.\n\nExample:\nI wish I hadn’t gotten that new car now that I’m shelling out $1,000 a month in payments.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Midas touch\n\n🪄This idiom comes from the story of King Midas, who turned everything he touched into gold. It’s used to say that someone is very successful in their business ventures and has an easy time making money.\n\nExample:\nJane really has the Midas touch. Every business she starts becomes very successful.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Go with the flow\n\n🪄To go with the flow is to allow things to happen and accept them as they are, like a leaf floating along on the surface of a river.\n\nExample:\nJust go with the flow and see what happens!\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Lost at sea\n\n🪄Just as you’d be overwhelmed if you were stranded in the ocean, to be lost at sea is to feel unsure about what to do or that you don’t have any purpose or plan.\n\nExample:\nI feel lost at sea. I just don’t think this is the career path for me.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Receive a kickback\n\n🪄If you receive a kickback, it means you are receiving money illegally, like a bribe.\n\nExample:\nThe police chief was arrested after it was revealed that he was receiving kickbacks to ignore certain crimes.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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1,644

🪩 Living hand to mouth\n\n🪄This means you’re barely earning enough to survive: any money that comes into your hand is immediately spent on food to put in your mouth.\n\nExample:\nI don’t make much from my job as a cashier, but I’m able to make ends meet.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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📌Follow TOP English Learning Channels in the World!\n\n👇👇👇\n\n✦ English Slang Words \n\n✦ English Stories \n\n✦ English Idioms \n\n✦ English Phrasal Verbs\n\n✦ English Phrases & Expressions\n\n✦ English Collocations\n\n✦ English Podcasts\n\n✦ Daily English Conversations \n\n✦ English Language\n\n✦ Espresso English\n\n✦ English Quizzes\n\n✦ English Proverbs \n\n✦ English Gate Learners\n\n✦ English Songs Lyrics\n\n✦ TOEFL English\n\n✦ English Grammar \n\n✦ English Vocabulary\n\n✦ English Language\n\n✦ IELTS English \n\n👆👆👆\n\n🙌Join them all👏


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🪩 As genuine as a three-dollar bill\n\n🪄This is an American idiom that is used to say something is fake. The U.S. never made three-dollar bills, so there’s no such thing as a genuine three-dollar bill.\n\nExample:\nThose supposed designer bags they sell on the street are as genuine as a three-dollar bill.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 In the red\n\n🪄In a traditional ledger book, debits (losses) are noted in red ink. To be in the red is to lose more money than you make.\n\nExample:\nI’m in the red this month after paying that speeding ticket.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 In the black\n\n🪄The opposite of being in the red is being in the black, which means that you’ve made more money than you spent.\n\nExample:\nAfter working a couple of small jobs over the weekend, I earned an extra $500 and am back in the black.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Eyeball it\n\n🪄Sometimes you don’t need an exact measurement: a rough estimate is good enough. When you estimate an amount of something based on how it looks, you can say you’re eyeballing it.\n\nExample:\nI’ve made this recipe often, so I didn’t bother to measure out a cup of rice; I just eyeballed it.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Keep your chin up\n\n🪄If you’re having a hard time, a supportive friend might tell you to keep your chin up. This means they are encouraging you to stay positive and not let difficult circumstances get you down.\n\nExample:\nI know it’s hard having a sick family member, but keep your chin up.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Find your feet\n\n🪄If you find yourself in a new situation, like living in a new country and having to get used to a new college, you could say you need to find your feet. It means that you’re still adjusting and getting used to the new environment.\n\nExample:\nI only moved to France two months ago, so I’m still finding my feet.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Bring home the bacon\n\n🪄To bring home the bacon means to make an income or earn a living to support your family.\n\nExample:\nEver since her father was injured, she’s been working two jobs to bring home the bacon.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Knuckle down\n\n🪄To knuckle down is to work hard or seriously at a task. If you tend to procrastinate, then you know when it’s time to do this.\n\nExample:\nMy essay is due tomorrow morning! I have to knuckle down and get it done tonight.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Bread and butter\n\n🪄Bread and butter are some of the most basic food items that one can live on. The idiom bread and butter refers to a job that makes the money you need to live and afford basic necessities like food, housing, etc.\n\nExample:\nFishing is the bread and butter of the friendly people I met on the island last summer.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Calm before the storm\n\n🪄The air may be still before a storm actually hits. To say there is a calm before the storm is basically saying that things may be peaceful now, but it won’t last.\n\nExample:\nThey had a bit of a honeymoon phase, but that was just the calm before the storm.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Get into deep water\n\n🪄This idiom is pretty close to the literal meaning: being in deep water means you’re in a tricky situation that is hard to escape.\n\nExample:\nHe got into deep water when he borrowed a lot of money from a loan shark.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Castle in the sky\n\n🪄This one sounds a bit like something from a fairytale, which makes sense since it is a daydream or hope that’s not likely to come true. Building castles in the sky refers to fantasizing about an unrealistic future.\n\nExample:\nSeeing the world used to be a castle in the sky for most people, but globalization is helping people travel more easily..\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Can’t see the forest for the trees\n\n🪄This means someone is unable to see the whole situation clearly because they’re looking too closely at small details.\n\nExample:\nHe’s worried about the flowers, but the rest of the wedding has been beautiful. He just can’t see the forest for the trees.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 To up the ante\n\n🪄A similar idiom to ante up is up the ante, which means “raise the stakes.” When people up the ante, they bet more money than the person before them. This is used similarly in everyday conversation, when someone raises a bet or agrees to do more.\n\nExample:\nI wanted to place a $10 bet on the soccer match, but Daniel upped the ante and raised the bet to $50.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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🪩 Spice things up\n\n🪄To spice things up means to make them more interesting or exciting.\n\nExample:\nInstead of just buying Sam a birthday gift, let’s spice things up by taking him out for dinner.\n▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬\n➠@PhrasalCards\n➠@SlangWords\n➠@IdiomsLand\n➠@Vocabulix\n➠@GrammarCards\n➠@EnglishGate\n➠@StoryPage


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